Historia Arizona hacia Estadidad

Historia Arizona hacia Estadidad

http://www.azlibrary.gov/is/statehood/index.aspx

This compilation incorporates sections, shown in italics, from Mulford Winsor’sArizona’s Way to Statehood (Phoenix, AZ: n.p., 1945 (reprint, Arizona Secretary of State, n.d.); AZDocs No.: SS 1.2:S 71). The Honorable Mulford Winsor (1874-1956) was a delegate to the Arizona Constitutional Convention of 1910 and was elected to the Arizona State Senate five times. He also served as Director of the Department of Library and Archives (now Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records) from 1932-1956. Mr. Winsornoted that Arizona’s road to statehood was not an easy one:

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In all, thirty-nine bills and twelve joint resolutions aimed exclusively or in conjunction with other Territories at statehood for Arizona were introduced in the two houses of Congress. Of these, twenty-nine bills and nine resolutions died in the committee of the house of origin, three bills were reported favorably but received no further consideration, four bills and one resolution passed the House of Representatives but did not reach a vote in the Senate, one bill passed both houses but died for want of agreement concerning amendments, one bill became a law but failed when its terms were rejected by the people of Arizona, one resolution passed both houses but was vetoed by the President, and one bill and one joint resolution, effecting the purpose for which they were designed, passed both houses and received the President’s approval.

Vean la historia de Arizona:  In 25+ years “39 bills and 12 joint resolutions for statehood” – but only one made it for Statehood.
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However, read what Congressman Hastings stated in this 2010 statement against Pierluisi’s bill – H.R. 2499:
“THE ALASKA & HAWAII PRECEDENT
Alaska and the Hawaii were the last two states admitted to the Union, and are the only two non-contiguous states. Both states followed a similar process to achieving statehood.  First, in some manner, each conducted its own local plebiscite/referendum of residents on statehood – and both passed with strong majorities. It was then, after the self-initiated request for statehood, that Congress responded. Congress then wrote and passed an Admissions Act that articulated and dictated the conditions and requirements for statehood. For both Alaska and Hawaii, the Admissions Acts included a straightforward ballot to be put to a vote of residents that included the question: “Shall Alaska/Hawaii immediately be admitted into the Union as a State?” 83% of Alaskans cast votes in favor, and 94% of Hawaiians voted in favor.  The process for both Alaska and Hawaii involved self-initiated local votes with strong majorities expressing the desire to become a state, and only then Congress passing an Admissions Act laying out what statehood would mean, which included a Congressionally-sanctioned and directed vote of residents on accepting or rejecting statehood. The responses were overwhelming majorities.”
My understanding is that, if we follow Congressman Hasting’s 2010 recommendations, as stated above, the next step for Puerto Rico is that Congress has to write and pass an Admission Act (like it did for Hawaii and Alaska).  The Admission Act shall include the conditions for statehood and shall also include a Congressionally-sanctioned and directed vote of PR residents on accepting or rejecting statehood.  This vote is NOT a new “status plebiscite” nor a statehood yes or no vote – this vote would be a final vote on whether Puerto Ricans want to accept statehood with the conditions provided by Congress in the Admissions Act.
The path for statehood is very clear to me. 
However, I do understand that many PNPs and statehood advocates are concerned on following this TRADITIONAL path to statehood on two counts.
1) Possible poison pills inserted (by PPD advocates) as conditions for statehood
2) Statehood would not get the 50%+ vote in the final Congressional mandated vote on accepting statehood
My response to the above two concerns are the following:
The above concerns will always exist regardless of what statehood process is done.
Instead of worrying about the possible battle outcomes, I would suggest to start preparing for battle.
Do not be afraid of the enemy before the battle is started – otherwise, we are doomed to fail.
Moreover, many territories attempted several Enabling or Admission Acts before finally gaining statehood.
This is not a one-shot deal here.
An Admission Act is not a once in a lifetime opportunity that PR cannot attempt or try again.
Therefore, the worst case scenario is that we fail our “first” attempt at anAdmission Act (that is better than doing nothing or wasting more time in colonial plebiscites).
Finally, but not less important, this statehood process (the Admission Act) is what our good friend, brilliant and excellent Congressman Hastings recommended for PR in 2010.
Saludos cordiales,
Frank
Para trabajar por la Estadidad: https://estado51prusa.com Seminarios-pnp.com https://twitter.com/EstadoPRUSA https://www.facebook.com/EstadoPRUSA/

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Para trabajar por la Estadidad: https://estado51prusa.com Seminarios-pnp.com https://twitter.com/EstadoPRUSA https://www.facebook.com/EstadoPRUSA/
Para trabajar por la Estadidad: https://estado51prusa.com Seminarios-pnp.com https://twitter.com/EstadoPRUSA https://www.facebook.com/EstadoPRUSA/