Statehood Wins Again – In 1917, Puerto Ricans became U.S. citizens. Everyone born in Puerto Rico is a citizen of the United States.

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PUERTO RICO REPORT



Statehood Wins Again

On June 11, 2017, Puerto Rico held a plebiscite in which 97% of the voters rejected the island’s current status as a U.S. territory in favor of statehood.

An independence/free association option received 1.5% of the vote, and 1.3% of the voters chose for Puerto Rico to remain a U.S. territory.

Statehood opponents dismissed the vote due to low voter turnout. Several elected officials in Washington D.C. joined pro-statehood Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló and Resident Commissioner Jenniffer Gonzáles-Colón in calling for a Congressional response.

As a U.S. territory, Puerto Rico can request statehood, but ultimately Congress has the power to determine Puerto Rico’s future.

Puerto Rico (San Juan) by Ricardo Mangual on Flickr

PHOTO BY RICARDO MANGUAL

Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States. The U.S. acquired Puerto Rico from Spain in 1898, and the Island has belonged to the United States ever since.

In 1917, Puerto Ricans became U.S. citizens. Everyone born in Puerto Rico is a citizen of the United States.

But Puerto Rico is not a state. It continues to be a territory. Under the U.S. Constitution, Congress has “plenary” – complete – power over Puerto Rico, as is clear by the authority of the unpopular and congressionally created Federal Oversight and Management Board (FOMB) . It is legal for Congress to treat Puerto Rico differently from states, and Puerto Ricans do not share in the same rights and responsibilities as their fellow U.S. citizens.

There are no senators or voting congressional representatives for Puerto Rico. The Island has just one non-voting representative in the U.S. Congress. The people of Puerto Rico cannot vote in presidential elections; they have no electors in the Electoral College.

Puerto Ricans serve in the U.S. military at higher than average rates and yet they cannot vote for their Commander in Chief.

Puerto Ricans fight for democracy around the world and yet do not experience democracy at home.

With so little representation, and no legal requirement that Congress treat Puerto Rico equally, it’s no surprise that Puerto Rico receives less federal attention, protections, and resources than the states.

Puerto Rico is also not a country. While Puerto Rico fields successful sports teams in international sporting events and competes in international beauty pageants, those teams and individuals could also be a part of U.S. delegations. The government of Puerto Rico simply doesn’t have the stature of a nation in the foreign arena, whether at the United Nations, World Bank, or in bilateral discussions with sovereign nations.

And, while the title of Puerto Rico includes the word “commonwealth” (just like the titles of Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Kentucky), that word has no legal meaning in the United States. Puerto Rico is simply a territory belonging to the United States.



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Schumer Announces Plans to Push for More Puerto Rico Medicaid Funding in 2020December 19th 2019

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Rivera Schatz letter

President of Puerto Rico Senate Urges Federal Lawmakers to Extend Child Tax CreditDecember 13th 2019

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Statehood Wins Again

On June 11, 2017, Puerto Rico held a plebiscite in which 97% of the voters rejected the island’s current status as a U.S. territory in favor of statehood.

An independence/free association option received 1.5% of the vote, and 1.3% of the voters chose for Puerto Rico to remain a U.S. territory.

Statehood opponents dismissed the vote due to low voter turnout. Several elected officials in Washington D.C. joined pro-statehood Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló and Resident Commissioner Jenniffer Gonzáles-Colón in calling for a Congressional response.

As a U.S. territory, Puerto Rico can request statehood, but ultimately Congress has the power to determine Puerto Rico’s future.

Puerto Rico (San Juan) by Ricardo Mangual on Flickr

PHOTO BY RICARDO MANGUAL

Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States. The U.S. acquired Puerto Rico from Spain in 1898, and the Island has belonged to the United States ever since.

In 1917, Puerto Ricans became U.S. citizens. Everyone born in Puerto Rico is a citizen of the United States.

But Puerto Rico is not a state. It continues to be a territory. Under the U.S. Constitution, Congress has “plenary” – complete – power over Puerto Rico, as is clear by the authority of the unpopular and congressionally created Federal Oversight and Management Board (FOMB) . It is legal for Congress to treat Puerto Rico differently from states, and Puerto Ricans do not share in the same rights and responsibilities as their fellow U.S. citizens.

There are no senators or voting congressional representatives for Puerto Rico. The Island has just one non-voting representative in the U.S. Congress. The people of Puerto Rico cannot vote in presidential elections; they have no electors in the Electoral College.

Puerto Ricans serve in the U.S. military at higher than average rates and yet they cannot vote for their Commander in Chief.

Puerto Ricans fight for democracy around the world and yet do not experience democracy at home.

With so little representation, and no legal requirement that Congress treat Puerto Rico equally, it’s no surprise that Puerto Rico receives less federal attention, protections, and resources than the states.

Puerto Rico is also not a country. While Puerto Rico fields successful sports teams in international sporting events and competes in international beauty pageants, those teams and individuals could also be a part of U.S. delegations. The government of Puerto Rico simply doesn’t have the stature of a nation in the foreign arena, whether at the United Nations, World Bank, or in bilateral discussions with sovereign nations.

And, while the title of Puerto Rico includes the word “commonwealth” (just like the titles of Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Kentucky), that word has no legal meaning in the United States. Puerto Rico is simply a territory belonging to the United States.

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Following a cut in the cost extension for Medicaid funding in Puerto Rico, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said that he will press for longer term funding in the new year. READ MORE (https://www.puertoricoreport.com/schumer-announces-plans-to-push-for-more-puerto-rico-medicaid-funding-in-2020/#.Xf0XjkxFzGE)

Resident Commissioner Jenniffer Gonzalez Colon pointed out Puerto Rico’s political status as the reason why the territory is forced to fight every year for Medicaid funding that is provided to the States automatically. READ MORE (https://www.puertoricoreport.com/medicaid-fix-reflects-disadvantages-of-being-a-u-s-territory/#.Xf0XjExFzGE)

Governor Wanda Vazquez wrote Congressional leaders to reiterate the importance of securing Medicaid funding for Puerto Rico, nothing the need to avoid a potential Medicaid cliff as soon as February 2020. READ MORE (https://www.puertoricoreport.com/governor-vazquez-reminds-congress-of-medicaid-needs/#.Xf0XiUxFzGE)

Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg unveiled a plan for Latino citizens of the United States that includes two specific actions for Puerto Rico: political representation and equitable Medicaid funding. READ MORE (https://www.puertoricoreport.com/pete-buttigiegs-plan-for-puerto-rico/#.Xf0XikxFzGE)

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT…

Members of Congress, including Reps. Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Joaquin Castro (D-TX), expressed concern over Puerto Rico’s continued wait for already appropriated recovery funds, noting it has been more than two years since Hurricane Maria. READ MORE (https://www.puertoricoreport.com/puerto-ricans-continue-to-wait-for-disaster-funds/#.Xf0aMUxFzGF)

Puerto Rico Senate President Thomas Rivera Schatz wrote to Congressional leadership asking that Congress extend the Child Tax Credit to Puerto Rico on an equivalent basis with the States. READ MORE (https://www.puertoricoreport.com/president-of-puerto-rico-senate-urges-federal-lawmakers-to-extend-child-tax-credit/#.Xf0aS0xFzGF)
http://www.puertoricoreport.com/puerto-rico-a-u-s-territory/#.WSkoPGjyuUkhttp://www.puertoricoreport.com/what-will-happen-to-u-s-citizenship-in-a-new-nation-of-puerto-rico-the-word-from-washington/#.WSkoO2jyuUkhttp://www.puertoricoreport.com/whats-free-associated-state/#.WSkoP2jyuUk
PUERTO RICO: A U.S. TERRITORY
Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States. It became a U.S. territory in 1898, when it was acquired from Spain
READ MORE (http://www.puertoricoreport.com/puerto-rico-a-u-s-territory/#.WSkoPGjyuUk) WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO U.S. CITIZENSHIP IN A NEW NATION OF PUERTO RICO? THE WORD FROM WASHINGTON

READ MORE (http://www.puertoricoreport.com/what-will-happen-to-u-s-citizenship-in-a-new-nation-of-puerto-rico-the-word-from-washington/#.WSkoO2jyuUk) WHAT’S A FREE ASSOCIATED STATE?
Historically, there have been three political parties in Puerto Rico, each one associated with a political status:
READ MORE (http://www.puertoricoreport.com/whats-free-associated-state/#.WSkoP2jyuUk)
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Para trabajar por la Estadidad: https://estado51prusa.com Seminarios-pnp.com https://twitter.com/EstadoPRUSA https://www.facebook.com/EstadoPRUSA/
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